Tag Archives: Pastoral Visitation

Visit the Sick by Brian Croft

Visit the Sick: Ministering God’s Grace in Times of Illness by Brian Croft. Leiominster, NZ: DayOne, 2008, 90 pp. Visiting the sick is an important pastoral responsibility and privilege that is being marginalized in these days of the pastor-as-CEO. I … Continue reading

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More Pastoral Visitation Questions

The pastoral visitation questions from Mark Dever considered in the last post were few in number and (realtively) open-ended. Here is a much more comprehensive, specific set of questions from Paul Martin, based on his church’s covenant. These are used in scheduled elder visits, as well as in … Continue reading

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Pastoral Visitation Questions from Mark Dever

A difficult element of private pastoral ministry for me is simply knowing the right questions to ask. Because we see “spiritual conversation” rarely modeled, it can be daunting to sit across the table from a church member you want to disciple, but can think of … Continue reading

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Brown’s Visitation Strategy, Part 2: Resolution

Yesterday, Charles Brown (1806-1884) spoke to the issue of frustration in pastoral visitation of his flock (see below). Today, I’d like to share the resolution Brown arrived at when a serious illness forced him to scale back his workload: “First, I visited only … Continue reading

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Brown’s Visitation Strategy, Part 1: Frustration

Without question, my favorite part of Charles J. Brown’s The Ministry are the four pages dedicated exclusively to the issue of “Pastoral Visitation.” Brown begins, first of all, with the assumption that all pastors will visit their flock. But he realizes … Continue reading

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Pastoral Resolutions of Philip Doddridge

“I have many cares and troubles: may God forgive me, that I am so apt to forget those of the Pastoral office! I now resolve, 1. To take a more particular account of the souls committed to my care. 2. To … Continue reading

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